How do you store blood smears?

How do you store blood smears?

Store slides at room temperature. 12. Do not refrigerate slides or package with formalin containers. Common Causes of a Poor Blood Smear • As soon as the drop of blood is placed on the glass slide, there should be no delay in the making of the smear.

How do you store Giemsa stain?

Store the Giemsa stock and buffered water in tightly stoppered, dark bottles in a cool place away from direct sunlight. Filter the small amount of Giemsa stain that will be used as a working solution and not the whole bottle. Do not return unused stain to the stock bottle or to the bottle used in daily routine.

How long can blood smear be stored?

Staining smears The stock buffer should be kept in the refrigerator, but if not possible, can be stored at room temperature for several weeks. Make working buffer which can be stored at room temperature for a few days. Buffer should be pH 7.0 to 7.2.

How do you stain a blood smear with Giemsa?

Staining procedure 1: Thin Film staining

  1. On a clean dry microscopic glass slide, make a thin film of the specimen (blood) and leave to air dry.
  2. dip the smear (2-3 dips) into pure methanol for fixation of the smear, leave to air dry for 30seconds.
  3. Flood the slide with 5% Giemsa stain solution for 20-30 minutes.

How does Wright Giemsa stain work?

Wright Giemsa Stain is a modified Romanowsky Stain technique, which is used to stain the smears of blood and marrow. The Staining of cells involves physical adsorption and chemical affinity which allows the stain to penetrate and remain within cells.

What stain is used for blood smears?

Blood films are routinely stained with a Romanowsky-type stain (e.g., Wright or Wright-Giemsa) either manually or using an automatic slide stainer. Romanowsky-type stains are composed of a mixture of eosin and oxidized methylene blue (azure) dyes.

How long does Giemsa stain last?

Working Giemsa Buffer 0.0067M, pH 7.2 Stock Giemsa Buffer 10.0 ml Deionized water 990.0 ml Check pH before use. Should be 7.2. Stable at room temperature for one month.

Why do we use Giemsa stain?

It can be used for histopathological diagnosis of the Plasmodium species that cause malaria and some other spirochete and protozoan blood parasites. It is also used in Wolbachia cell stain in Drosophila melanogaster. Giemsa stain is a classic blood film stain for peripheral blood smears and bone marrow specimens.

What stain is used to stain blood smear?

Romanowsky-Type Stains. Blood films are routinely stained with a Romanowsky-type stain (e.g., Wright or Wright-Giemsa) either manually or using an automatic slide stainer. Romanowsky-type stains are composed of a mixture of eosin and oxidized methylene blue (azure) dyes.

Does Giemsa stain expire?

Giemsa stain Sterile buffer is stable at room temperature for one year. Check pH before use. Should be 7.2. Stable at room temperature for one month.

What type of stain is Giemsa stain?

blood film stain
Giemsa stain is a classic blood film stain for peripheral blood smears and bone marrow specimens. Erythrocytes stain pink, platelets show a light pale pink, lymphocyte cytoplasm stains sky blue, monocyte cytoplasm stains pale blue, and leukocyte nuclear chromatin stains magenta.

What does the Giemsa stain stain for?

Giemsa is the prototypical stain used to detect malaria and Trypanosoma-infected blood (Figure 5). Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes and mature trophozoites can be detected using thin and thick smears, respectively. WBCs, platelets, and remnants of RBCs are also visible with Giemsa staining on thin and thick smears.